DON isotopes over a coral reef (Thibodeau et al., Coral Reefs)

Heterogeneous dissolved organic nitrogen supply over a coral reef: first evidence from nitrogen stable isotope ratios

B. Thibodeau, T. Miyajima, I. Tayasu, A. S. J. Wyatt, A. Watanabe, N. Morimoto, C. Yoshimizu, T. Nagata

Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) potentially plays a major role in sustaining the high productivity and biological diversity of coral reefs. However, data are scarce regarding sources and sinks of DON. This study, for the first time, determined the 15N isotopic composition of total dissolved nitrogen (δ15NTDN), reflecting the isotopic signature of DON, in the water column over a coral reef. The uniformity in δ15NTDN during high tide (3.2 ± 0.3 ‰) indicated that the DON was mainly derived from offshore waters. In contrast, higher spatial heterogeneity of δ15NTDN (3.1 ± 0.9 ‰) and DON concentrations during low tide indicated the existence of local DON sources patchily distributed over the reef. Low δ15NTDN values located mid-reef were indicative of DON release from organisms that obtained their N via N2 fixation, whereas high δ15NTDN appeared to reflect localized release of DON by organisms exposed to dissolved inorganic nitrogen with elevated 15N, such as from terrestrial and offshore inputs. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of spatial patterns in DON release from reef communities in the N cycling of coral reefs.

Reef fish trophodynamics (Wyatt et al., Coral Reefs)

Stable isotope analysis reveals community-level variation in fish trophodynamics across a fringing coral reef

A. S. J. Wyatt, A. M. Waite, S. Humphries

In contrast to trophodynamic variations, the marked zonation in physical and biological processes across coral reefs and the concomitant changes in habitat and community structure are well documented. In this study, we demonstrate consistent spatial changes in the community-level trophodynamics of 46 species of fish across the fringing Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, using tissue stable isotope and fatty acid analyses. Increasing nitrogen (δ15N) and decreasing carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios in the tissues of herbivores, planktivores and carnivores with increasing proximity to the ocean were indicative of increased reliance on oceanic productivity. In contrast, detritivores and corallivores displayed no spatial change in δ15N or δ13C, indicative of the dependence on reef-derived material across the reef. Higher δ13C, as well as increased benthic- and bacterial-specific fatty acids, suggested reliance on reef-derived production increased in back-reef habitats. Genus-level analyses supported community- and trophic group-level trends, with isotope modelling of species from five genera (Abudefduf sexfasciatus, Chromis viridis, Dascyllus spp.,Pomacentrus spp. and Stegastes spp.), demonstrating declining access to oceanic zooplankton and, in the case of Pomacentrus spp. and Stegastes spp., a switch to herbivory in the back-reef. The spatial changes in fish trophodynamics suggest that the relative roles of oceanic and reef-derived nutrients warrant more detailed consideration in reef-level community ecology.

Picoplankton and virus uptake by a coral reef (Patten et al., Coral Reefs)

Uptake of picophytoplankton, bacterioplankton and virioplankton by a fringing coral reef community (Ningaloo Reef, Australia)

Nicole L. Patten, Alex S.J. Wyatt, Ryan J. Lowe, Anya M. Waite

We examined the importance of picoplankton and virioplankton to reef trophodynamics at Ningaloo Reef, (north-western Australia), in May and November 2008. Picophytoplankton (Prochlorococcus,Synechococcus and picoeukaryotes), bacterioplankton (inclusive of bacteria and Archaea), virioplankton and chlorophyll a (Chl a) were measured at five stations following the consistent wave-driven unidirectional mean flow path of seawater across the reef and into the lagoon.Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes and bacterioplankton were depleted to similar levels (~40% on average) over the fore reef, reef crest and reef flat (=‘active reef’), with negligible uptake occurring over the sandy bottom lagoon. Depletion of virioplankton also occurred but to more variable levels. Highest uptake rates, m, of picoplankton occurred over the reef crest, while uptake coefficients, S (independent of cell concentration), were similarly scaled over the reef zones, indicating no preferential uptake of any one group. Collectively, picophytoplankton, bacterioplankton and virioplankton accounted for the uptake of 29 mmol C m−2 day−1, with Synechococcuscontributing the highest proportion of the removed C. Picoplankton and virioplankton accounted for 1–5 mmol N m−2 day−1 of the removed N, with bacterioplankton estimated to be a highly rich source of N. Results indicate the importance of ocean–reef interactions and the dependence of certain reef organisms on picoplanktonic supply for reef-level biogeochemistry processes.

Keywords: Coral reef, Picoplankton, Virus, Uptake, Ningaloo Reef, Indian Ocean